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Cataract

Cataract is a clouding of the normally clear lens in the eye. This blocks the light from reaching the retina and causes unclear vision. As the cataract progresses, it causes hazy vision and may interfere with your daily activities. Cataract usually develops in people older than 45 years of age and as the vision deteriorates, the only available treatment for cataract is surgery.
Most cataracts develop slowly and don't disturb your eyesight early on. But with time, cataracts will eventually interfere with your vision.At first, stronger lighting and eyeglasses can help you deal with cataracts. But if impaired vision interferes with your usual activities, you might need cataract surgery. Fortunately, cataract surgery is generally a safe, effective procedure.

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Types Of Cataract

Cataract affecting the center of the lens

A nuclear cataract may at first cause more nearsightedness or even a temporary improvement in your reading vision. But with time, the lens gradually turns more densely yellow and further clouds your vision.

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Cataract that affect the edges of the lens

A cortical cataract begins as whitish, wedge-shaped opacities or streaks on the outer edge of the lens cortex. As it slowly progresses, the streaks extend to the center and interfere with light passing through the center of the lens.

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Low-tension or normal-tension glaucoma

In these types of glaucoma, optic nerve damage and vision loss occurs even though IOP remains normal. Low blood pressure may be a risk factor.

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Cataract you're born with

Some people are born with cataracts or develop them during childhood. These cataracts may be genetic, or associated with an intrauterine infection or trauma. These cataracts also may be due to certain conditions, such as myotonic dystrophy, galactosemia, neurofibromatosis type 2 or rubella.

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Cataracts that affect the back of the lens

A posterior subcapsular cataract starts as a small, opaque area that usually forms near the back of the lens, right in the path of light. A posterior subcapsular cataract often interferes with your reading vision, reduces your vision in bright light, and causes glare or halos around lights at night. These types of cataracts tend to progress faster than other types do.